Battle of mysunde 1864 film

The Prussian vanguard force of 10, men attempted to break through and outflank the Danish defenses at Danevirkebut were repulsed by the fortification garrison and two battalions of the Danish army. Danish public opinion expected the forthcoming war with the German allies to take place at the Danevirke, placing almost mythological belief in the impenetrability of the fortification system.

In practice, the fortification system had fallen into disrepair. The barracks for the soldiers had not been built, connecting roads were not constructed, and the obstacles in front of the fortifications had not been put in place. As a result, when the Danish army entered the positions in January, they had a lot of work to do, with the winter frost making digging difficult.

In addition, the line of fortifications at Danevirke was far too long to be adequately defended by the 38, man Danish army. Mysunde itself was a small fishing village of approximately two dozen houses on the south side of the Schlei. It was a part of the eastern fortifications of Danevirke, but the real importance of the position was due to narrowness of the Schlei at this point.

This meant that it was one of the few points where the eastern flank of Danevirke was not made impenetrable by natural obstacles. Consequently, the defense of the position was of great strategic importance; a breakthrough at the crossing point would allow the Prussians to envelop and surround the Danish forces at Danevirke, while the Austrians kept the Danes pinned in their positions.

However, the Prussians soon discovered that the Danish army had no intention of defending Kochendorf and had retreated northward. Bythe vanguard were able to report that Kochendorf was in Prussian hands. The decision to push on and capture Mysunde was immediately taken. Three Brigades remained in reserve, while the rest of the Corps continued the advance. By 10 o'clock, Major v.

battle of mysunde 1864 film

Krohn leading the Fusilier Battalion of the 24th Regiment was in sight of the Danish positions at Mysunde. The Danish position at Mysunde was essentially a series of bastions placed around the village.

battle of mysunde 1864 film

The two most important bastions; referred to as A and B, were placed on either side of the southern road leading into the village. The position was defended by the 6th Fortification battalion led by Captain Hertel, who had at his disposition 20 cannons and about men, as well as the 1st battalion of the 18th Regiment. Bastion A had 4, pound and 4, pound guns, while Bastion B had 4, pound and 2, pound guns.

All of the Danish cannon were the old-fashioned muzzle-loading smoothbore variety, while the Prussians wielded more accurate and long-range breech-loading rifled cannon. The Prussian Vanguard was led by the three Fusilier battalions of the 13th, 15th, and 24th Regiment, as well as the 1st Battalion of the 60th Regiment, and the Westphalian Rifle Battalion.

After a brief but intense firefight, the Danish troops retreated back towards Mysunde. A dense fog this morning made it extremely difficult to determine enemy movements, and consequently only a few shots were fired from the Danish guns in the bastions as the Prussians closed in on Mysunde.

Atthe 1st Battalion of the 3rd Danish Regiment arrived at Mysunde under the command of Captain Arntz, and along with a squadron of dragoons, the force carried out a reconnaissance in front of the bastions.

A thousand paces in front of the bastions, they encountered the fusilier battalions of the 15th and 24th Prussian Regiments and came under intense fire. Lieutenant Hagemann of the 24th Regiment was the first Prussian officer to be killed, but Major v. Krohn lead the Fusilier Battalion in a bayonet attack that threw the Danish infantry back. With several officers wounded or killed, Captain Arntz ordered his battalion into position at the bastions.

It is only at this point, that the Danish commanders realised that they were facing not just a Prussian reconnaissance force, but an actual assault on the fortifications. Having successfully thrown back the three Companies of Captain Arntz's battalion, the Prussian Fusiliers continued their advance, occupying on the right flank a fence just a hundred meters from Bastion B and other cover to meters out from the center of the Danish position.

A lively exchange of fire played out between the Prussian attackers and the Danish defenders, with scant protection for either side as the trenches were in disrepair. Danish eyewitness accounts from the battle describe having to lie on their belly on the frozen ground while exchanging fire with the Prussians. At aroundthe Prussian artillery had begun to arrive in front of Missunde and it deployed on a ridge in front of the position with a battery of 24 6-pound cannon and 24 howitzers.

At it opened fire on the bastions, followed shortly after by 16 additional guns from the Reserve artillery. With their numerical superiority, the Prussian command hoped to suppress or drive back the Danish fortification troops by the weight of their fire. An intense artillery duel developed between the 20 Danish cannon in the bastions and the 64 Prussian cannon on the ridges one Prussian battery reportedly fired more than rounds.

File:Battle of Missunde, 1864.jpg

However, the fog made identifying and targeting the enemy positions effectively impossible. As the smoke from the cannons mingled with the fog and further obscured the features of the terrain, the artillerymen on both sides were soon reduced to simply aiming at the flashes from the cannon fire of their opponents.

From their positions in the trenches, the Prussian infantry were causing significant casualties among the Danish artillerymen, particularly in the exposed Bastion B.The Prussian vanguard force of 10, men attempted to break through and outflank the Danish defenses at Danevirkebut were repulsed by the fortification garrison and two battalions of the Danish army. Danish public opinion expected the forthcoming war with the German allies to take place at the Danevirke, placing almost mythological belief in the impenetrability of the fortification system.

In practice, the fortification system had fallen into disrepair. The barracks for the soldiers had not been built, connecting roads were not constructed, and the obstacles in front of the fortifications had not been put in place.

As a result, when the Danish army entered the positions in January, they had a lot of work to do, with the winter frost making digging difficult. In addition, the line of fortifications at Danevirke was far too long to be adequately defended by the 38, man Danish army.

Mysunde itself was a small fishing village of approximately two dozen houses on the south side of the Schlei. It was a part of the eastern fortifications of Danevirke, but the real importance of the position was due to narrowness of the Schlei at this point.

This meant that is was one of the few points were the eastern flank of Danevirke was not made impenetrable by natural obstacles. Consequently, the defense of the position was of great strategic importance; a breakthrough at the crossing point would allow the Prussians to envelop and surround the Danish forces at Danevirke, while the Austrians kept the Danes pinned in their positions.

However, the Prussians soon discovered that the Danish army had no intention of defending Kochendorf and had retreated northward. Bythe vanguard were able to report that Kochendorf was in Prussian hands. The decision to push on and capture Mysunde was immediately taken. Three Brigades remained in reserve, while the rest of the Corps continued the advance. By 10 o'clock, Major v. Krohn leading the Fusilier Battalion of the 24th Regiment was in sight of the Danish positions at Mysunde.

The Danish position at Mysunde was essentially a series of bastions placed around the village. The two most important bastions; referred to as A and B, were placed on either side of the southern road leading into the village.

The position was defended by the 6th Fortification battalion led by Captain Hertel, who had at his disposition 20 cannons and about men, as well as the 1st battalion of the 18th Regiment. Bastion A had 4 24 pound and 4 12 pound guns, while Bastion B had 4 24 pound and 2 12 pound guns.This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or fewer.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published or registered with the U. Copyright Office before January 1, From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository.

File information. Structured data. Captions English Add a one-line explanation of what this file represents. Summary [ edit ] Description Battle of Missunde, Contemporary illustration, as seen from the Prussian lines. The burning village of Missunde is seen in the background, the bastions with the Danish defenders are covered in mist on the left side.

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1864

Main page Welcome Community portal Village pump Help center. Upload file Recent changes Latest files Random file Contact us. Download as PDF Printable version. Description Battle of Missunde, Public domain Public domain false false.Intoxicated and obsessed with the thought of hurting Peter and Laust, Didrich reveals to Peter that Laust and Inge harbor a secret.

Peter decides to find Laust to make peace with him. A warning of Denmark is in a state of shock. The army has been destroyed and the country now lies open to the Prussians. The rug is pulled out from under Monrad when his former supporters turn their backs on him Monrad forces a new constitution through Parliament that incorporates Schleswig into the Danish kingdom, and, as expected, triggers a declaration of war from Prussia.

Laust and Peter meet their young See photos of celebrities like Scarlett Johansson and Leonardo DiCaprio before they hit the big-time, and revisit their earliest onscreen roles. See the full gallery. The Danes are thrilled after the victory in the 1st Schleswig War. Danish politicians now dream of incorporating Schleswig into the Kingdom of Denmark, in defiance of the peace agreement. Monrad Nicolas Broclaims that Schleswig must be incorporated to the Kingdom, everyone is aware that it is the start of 2nd Schleswig War.

An army much bigger and stronger than the Danish. Inges old dairy catches Claudias interest, and through Inges writings, Claudia experience thousands of young Written by Frederik B. InDenmark launched what seems in retrospect an inexplicable war of national expansion. It ended in ignominious defeat at the hands of Bismark's Prussian army. There's been a lot of Danish drama released internationally in recent years, but it's a small country, and fans of other Danish series will recognise a huge proportion of the cast in this one.

But sadly, '' does not live up to the standards of 'The Killing' or 'Borgen'. It's slow, ponderous, repetitive, obvious and the attempt to wrap up the 19th century story in a contemporary wrapping further reduces the immediacy of the drama. The budget for battle scenes, meanwhile, seems to have been spent entirely in episode 7, which is impressive in itself, but the rest of the episodes speak of war without actually showing it very much.

And we never really understand just how the Danish politicians thought that the war could actually be won. Outside of Denmark, the war of is a little known quirk of European history; I'd be interested to know more, but in spite of its 8 hour duration, I finished this drama still frustratingly uninformed. Looking for something to watch? Choose an adventure below and discover your next favorite movie or TV show. Visit our What to Watch page.

Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates.Of the three larger battles fought during the campaign the conflict at Mysunde is the least well known.

There are a variety of reasons for this, the main one probably being its short duration. This relative lack of importance did not dissuade the Newspaper reporters of the time from devoting several columns of the Illustrated London News. The article begins by outlining the principle aspects of the action.

battle of mysunde 1864 film

The severest engagement that has taken place between the two armies since the battle of Idstedt, occurred on Thursday, the 12th of September. After cannonading the defences of the bridge on the north bank of the Schlei for more than an hour the artillery was recalled, and the troops supporting it retired along the line of country by which they had advanced during the day, bivouacking to the north of their original positions.

As their own correspondent was with the Duchy forces the article goes on to detail his observations of the preparations for the attack and of the march up to Mysunde. It was known on the evening of the 11ththat a movement somewhat more important than usual was contemplated. The wagons that had gone in the night were already packed with the knapsacks of the infantry and chasseurs which are thus taken on without compelling the men to march under an oppressive weight.

Further on, two pontoons were mounted on wagons, with others carrying the materials for bridging over a stream; but they were never used and this part of the train did nothing but encumber the narrow roads.

The first purpose of the movement was to clear all the country north from the head of the Wittensee Lake to Mysunde, and as far west of it towards Schleswig as might be possible, of the Danish troops encamped in the intervening space, but not entrenched. I took the same road as the 4th battalion of infantry to 0sterbye, since one route must needs be chosen, and cannot speak of what occurred on the left and centre except from report.

It was a lovely morning, cool, with a brilliant sun — one of those days which make the early autumn one of the most pleasant seasons of the year. The lake shone like a sheet of silver, and the wooded banks were reflected clear and sharp in it to every minute detail in its depth. It was anticipated that the Danish outposts would be found somewhere about Osterbye, and the calculation proved pretty correct. We had got beyond Osterbye, and were approaching Kochendorf before anything was visible ; but there we saw the last of a Danish company being driven from a wood to the right of the latter village.

The Danes retired so readily, and were dislodged from point to point with so little difficulty, that they plainly acted on orders to fall back if attacked in any force, without exposing themselves to loss, and retire within the fortified position behind themthus the advance was little more than a march.

But the country between Kochendorf and Mysunde was not quite cleared of them ; a few field-pieces were still keeping up a fire on them as the 2nd and 4th battalions of the Holsteiners were coming up from the rear and forming a little in advance of the village itself.

A cannonade in front indicated that the attack on the bridge had begun.

battle of mysunde 1864 film

The correspondents view of the actual battle was limited due to his position but the article does include his observations and conclusions which were contained in a separate letter. The bridge itself is so completely covered by the works, which must be constructed with great skill, that from no point the Holsteiners reached could they fire with any effect on the bridge itself, or it must have been shot to pieces ; only some guns far to our left were brought to bear on a portion of it, but did no damage.

The peasants with the wagons and wounded put their horses to the top of their speed down the sandy road ; and for a quarter of an hour there was a chariot race worthy of any ancient arena. It was the only time they were under fire during the day. Some of the shots went right through the column, and I understand, caused some loss and a momentary confusionbut the mass stood firm, and, as before described, the Danes did not pursue in the face of the superior force.

This was the close of the engagement. The Holsteiners, as they retired, set fire to the Danish camp at Kochendorf ; and several Danes who could not get away soon enough in the morning, and had hidden themselves in nooks and corners under the straw, were turned out of their hiding places by the flames, to the no small amusement of the Holsteiners, who did not suspect the place had any living tenants, at least human ones.

In two hours the camp was entirely destroyed. Smaller encampments at other points were given to the flames in the same manner, and our route southward was illuminated by several conflagrations on the hills behind us. The moon set calm and silvery, exactly opposite to the scene of destruction.

The narrow roads were choked up by the wagons conveying the wounded and baggage, and the artillery, but, as we were not pressed on, no casualties occurred.

A mill behind the town was set on fire, and burnt for many hours. The artillery was brought back to Damendorf, and the Infantry to the points south of it, but still in advance of their former position. The result of the affair may be briefly stated. If the object was to force that bridge at Mysunde, it was decidedly defeated, as no Impression was made on the works, and the Danes were able at the close of the day to become the assailant. If it was a mere reconnaissance, it only proved that the Danes are very strongly entrenched which was pretty well known before.It is based on two books by Tom Buk-Swienty about the Second Schleswig War of between Denmark and an alliance of Prussia and Austria which ended in defeat for Denmark and the loss of a quarter of its territory to Prussia.

It follows two brothers from a remote village on Funen who enlist in the Danish army just before the outbreak of war, and experience the horrors of combat in Schleswig. It also features actual historical figures such as Danish prime minister D. Monrad and Prussian prime minister Otto von Bismarck. It was the most expensive Danish TV series to be made to date. The director, Ole Bornedaldescribed it as "a classic story about power and the abuse of power The background to the opening credits is the painting Fra forposterne From the outposts, by Vilhelm Rosenstand.

Inthe people of a Danish village await the return of the victorious soldiers from the First Schleswig War.

Also returning is Didrich, son of the local landowner, the Baron, who served as a captain. Didrich has been severely damaged psychologically by the war and has also been tainted by cowardice; his father reveals that he bribed his fellow officers not to report him to the military authorities. Overjoyed to have their father home, Laust and Peter also befriend Inge Juel, the spirited daughter of the Baron's new estate manager. Didrich, too, who is increasingly becoming a dissolute alcoholic, has feelings for Inge, although she is only a child.

At the harvest festival celebrations he propositions her, but she slaps his face and runs away. Laust goes to work for the Baron as a stable boy.

Monradmeets famous actress Johanne Luise Heibergwho begins to encourage him in his nationalist ideas. In the s, Monrad is now Council President prime ministerand has become a convinced nationalist. He actively tries to provoke a war with Prussia over the Schleswig-Holstein Questionstill encouraged by Mrs Heiberg.

Battle of Mysunde (1864)

Monrad tries to persuade the new king, Christian IXthat declaring war would show the people that Christian, who was born in Schleswig and grew up speaking German, is a true Dane.

In Berlin, King Wilhelmhis minister-president, Otto von Bismarckand his chief of the general staffGeneral Helmuth von Moltkegreet Denmark's sabre-rattling with disbelief but also relief as such a war would fit perfectly into Bismarck's plan of placing Prussia as the dominant power in the German Confederation.

In the village, Laust and Peter have grown into young men, now both in love with Inge. Although Inge's father says they need help with the harvest, Didrich orders them to leave. Later, he and his dissolute friends catch Ignazio's son, Djargo, poaching pheasant on the Baron's land and severely flog him.

He is found by Laust, Peter and Inge, who take him to the Baron. The Baron chastises his son and gives the gypsies work in the harvest. He also persuades Laust and Peter and their friend Einar to join the army.

Battle of Mysunde

The brothers complete their basic training and return to the village on leave, arriving at the harvest festival celebrations. They leave with Inge and both end up kissing her.

However, after they leave her, Laust, on the pretext of going to search for his lost knife, returns to her without Peter's knowledge and they make love.

Later, Didrich, drunk as usual and unable to find Inge, rapes Ignazio's beautiful, mute daughter Sofia, who keeps the attack to herself. The brothers return to the army, where they and Einar are assigned to a company of the 8th Brigade. There they befriend Alfred, a naive young man from SkagenErasmus, a cheerful bearded giant who is a miller in civilian life, and Johan Larsen, a middle-aged veteran who has a reputation for being psychic and is soon promoted to corporal.

Monrad's plans are finally realised when he announces that Denmark has fully annexed Schleswig and Prussia decides to declare war. The 8th Brigade is sent south to occupy the Danevirkea line of fortifications which has always been regarded as the country's southern border and which is regarded in Danish mythology as impregnable.With a bitter winter came the onset of the Second Schleswig War.

It was February 2, in Mysunde and the Danish troops were positioned at Danevirke in anticipation of the attack that was to come from their Prussian enemies. The Danish army only started making preparations for the war when it became obvious that there was no other alternative in the last months of As political reforms in the unified monarchy increased, so did the disagreements between the Schleswig Duchy and the Danish Republic which climaxed after the November Constitution was passed into law by Christian IX albeit under pressure from the government.

The kingdoms of Austria and Prussia kicked against the constitution, insisting that it should not be allowed to stand. However, the Danish government would not back down over laws made in their own country leaving only one real solution to the dispute, War. The Danevirke, for all its historical popularity as the largest earthwork in northern Europe, was the prime location of the battle.

Popular among the Danes was the belief that the Danevirke was impregnable and maybe this would have been the case a couple of years before. But in truth, it was in a state of disrepair and dilapidated from previous use. There was much to be done at the site by the Danish troops under the command of General Christian De Meza.

The work began to rebuild the barracks, connecting roads and the installation of artillery. This took quite a few months to carry out as the cold of winter made digging of trenches much more difficult. The project was not yet complete before the soldiers moved into position in January. Meanwhile, the small village of Mysunde was part of the Danevirke fortifications and was inhabited by people whose main source of livelihood was fishing off the Baltic Sea.

The Prussian army decided to head for Mysunde because of its degree of exposure when compared with other parts of the Danevirke. The invading army had plans to break through the defensive positions of the Danish army and circle round, trapping them with their massive army of 10, against the Danish 2, the odds looked pretty favorable. The Prussian troops trudged through the frosty streets leading to the walls of the Danish stronghold at AM on February 2, seeking to engage the Danes at Mysunde after taking Kochendorf in the southeastern part of the Danevirke.

Mysunde was thus the next course of action for the Prussians, already having a successful morning and without any confrontation, they were eager to engage the Danish troops with hopes to overrun them at the village.

The Danish troops there fell back when they saw the mass of the army before them. Despite their efforts to hold them off, they were not be able to hold their position for long and after some minutes of intense fighting they abandoned their positions and made for Mysunde.

The weather was in favor of the advancing Prussian army who took advantage of the thick fog that engulfed the battlefield. Random fire was let out occasionally by the Danish soldiers occupying the bastions. The Prussian army had remained up until this point without a single casualty. However, their thoughts of taking Mysunde unscathed were rudely interrupted by the Danish after a stealthy reconnaissance force that was led by Captain Arntz of the Danish army to determine the location and state of the Prussians.

Hagemann, the first Prussian casualty who was soon joined by many others. When Arntz learned that they were up against a full Prussian assault, he ordered his men back to their positions in the bastions and rained fire on the enemy forces who continued their advance toward the village. By noon, the Prussian artillery started to engage the Danish positions releasing fire on the bastions from their howitzers and canons.

After an intense, yet unsuccessful attack on the fort by the Prussians, the battle was at a stalemate and the Danes began to fall back in the evening from the village much to the relief of the Danish soldiers who were already running out of supplies.


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